Titus
Introduction

1 2 3


Interpretation
Contradictions
Absurdities
Injustice
Intolerance
Good Stuff
Women
Family Values
Language

"Exhort servants to be obedient unto their own masters, and to please them well in all things." -- Titus 2:9

Titus for Skeptics

Although Titus claims to have been written by Paul, most scholars believe that it, along with the other pastoral epistles (1 and 2 Timothy), was written by someone else after Paul's death. (1)

There's not much of interest here. But we do learn about liars (God can't tell a lie, Jews and Cretans can't tell the truth), Jewish fables and genealogies (disregard them), wives and slaves (must be obedient), and heretics (are condemned by God and should be avoided).

Here are the highlights:

  • God, like George Washington (but unlike the author of Titus who falsely claims to be Paul), cannot tell a lie. 1:2

  • Jews are unruly liars "whose mouths must be stopped." 1:10-11

  • The people of Crete are "always liars, evil beasts, slow bellies." 1:12

  • Disregard "Jewish fables and commandments of men, that turn from the truth." Like most of the Bible, maybe? 1:14

  • "Teach the young women to be ... obedient to their own husbands." 2:4-5

  • Slaves must obey their masters and "please them well in all things ... showing all good fidelity." 2:9-10

  • "Avoid foolish ... genealogies." Like Gen.10, 1 Chr.1-9, and Lk.3? 3:9

  • Heretics are to be rejected since they are subverted sinners who are condemned by God. 3:10-11


1. Bart D. Ehrman, The New Testament: A Historical Introlduction to the Early Christian Writings, 3rd ed. (2004), chap.23

Wikipedia
Epistle to Titus
Authorship of the Pauline epistles: The Pastoral Epistles